Alpaca Facts and FAQ

Is An Alpaca A Good Pet?
What do Alpacas Eat?
Do Alpacas Need to Be Fenced In??
Do Alpacas Need Shelter?
How Much Room Does An Alpaca Need?
How Much Do Alpacas Weigh?
How Much Does An Alpaca Cost?
Do Alpacas Spit?

Is An Alpaca A Good Pet?

It depends on your definition of a pet. If you are looking for an animal that hangs out in the backyard without needing much care other than a feeding twice a day, than yes. They will be perfectly happy with you feeding them, going to work, and then feeding them again when you get home.

If you are looking for a pet that is going to come running to be pet when you pull in the driveway, then you don’t want an Alpaca. Alpacas are prey animals and are used to running away from anything that is not an Alpaca. They may get used to you enough that you can get a quick stroke in, but they will not come up and brush against you seeking attention. Read over our Alpaca Facts and then you can decide that answer for yourself.

What do Alpacas Eat?

What do Alpacas Eat?Alpacas are ruminants, or mammals that are able to acquire nutrients from plant-based food. They eat vegetation all day and then regurgitate it so that it can be chewed again. This allows them to be very efficient digesters since they eat vegetation with very low protein and mineral count.

They are best fed with pasture grown grasses and whatever else they find. They will mow the grass for you without ripping up the roots, allowing the grass to grow back if you rotate pastures. They are best suited for low protein grasses and high protein foods will disrupt fiber production.

During winter months, and in areas without pastures, the answer to “what do Alpaca’s eat” is a little different. They will need to be fed with hay purchased from your local farming store. Second cut hay is almost always best for an Alpaca and supplemental grain may need to be added to balance the diet.

Do Alpacas Need Shelter?

Yes, Alpacas need shelter to shed them from natural elements and protect them from overheating. It is also a good idea to shelter them so that they can stay out of the rain and keep their fleece protected.

Depending on where you live, you might just need a run in shelter, or maybe a full blown barn. A run in shelter is perfect for areas that do not get too cold in the winter. Keep in mind that Alpaca are native to cold environments, but Antarctica might be a little much for them!

Do Alpacas Need to Be Fenced In?

If you have a large enough pasture area, a fence may not be absolutely necessary but it is always a good idea. Half of the reason for a fence is to keep your animals in but the other half is keep predators out. A good fence will keep the Coyotes, or whatever local predators you encounter, out of your farm.

Check with local farms to see what size fence is common in your area. They will be able to give you some good insight on what you need to be able to protect yourself so that you know what kind of fencing to purchase. We also have other great Alpaca facts on this page for your to check out.

How Much Room Does An Alpaca Need?

How Much Room Does An Alpaca Need?This depends largely on what you are trying to achieve. If you are trying to keep your costs low and feed strictly on pasture foods, then you will need to stay below 5-6 Alpacas per acre of land. If you are ok with purchasing hay and feeding them that way, then you can safely fit 15-20 Alpaca on a single acre of land.

Alpaca do not need much room and will mostly stick in a group with the rest of the heard. They need enough room to walk around and that’s just about it. As long as they can get away from each other if a fight erupts, then you should be all set.

How Much Do Alpacas Weigh?

A full grown Alpaca can range between 130 and 170 pounds. Full grown males will be on the high end of that range, while females are on the low end. They are large animals, but about half the size of a llama.

How Much Does An Alpaca Cost?

Alpaca prices vary greatly in price. If you are just looking for a pet or fiber producing Alpaca that is not going to breed or expand your farm, then you are looking to spend about $400 an animal. If you are looking to purchase animals that will breed and grow your farm, then you are going to spend a whole lot more.

Alpaca that are Proven (have breed successfully) are worth more money because they are known to have had a live birth and provide properly for their young. If they are unproven, they are still going to be higher in price than a pet, but you are taking a chance on whether or not they will breed.

Most people looking to start their own heard will purchase the best quality females that they can afford. The farm that sells them to you will typically get them pregnant for you as well. This way you are really purchasing 6 Alpaca instead of the 3 that you are bringing home. That farm will also help you get on your feet by providing answers to simple questions like “what to Alpacas eat” and “do Alpacas spit”.

Once you have read all of our Alpaca facts, head over to how much does an Alpaca costs for more great information on this topic.

Do Alpacas Spit?

Yes, Alpacas do spit when they feel threatened. Unlike Llamas though, Alpacas are not like to spit on humans unless you really make them mad. If you get spit on, you most likely got caught in the crossfire between two Alpacas that are arguing.

Thanks for Reading our list of Alpaca Facts, we hope to see you again sometime soon!

The Benefits Of Owning An Alpaca Farm

Breeding Alpaca is essentialMany people have never heard of Alpaca’s and just assume they are a type of Llama. While they are similar in some ways, you aren’t likely to find a llama on an Alpaca farm. Alpaca’s are considerably smaller and are not used as “beasts of burden”, or animals that are meant to carry heavy loads.

Llamas tend to be a few hundred pounds heavier than Alpaca’s, and up to 2 feet taller. They also have ears that are shaped like a banana, while Alpaca’s have straight ears.

Alpaca’s are breed and kept for the fiber that they produce which can be spun and turned into yarn, much like a sheep. That yarn is then knitted into hats, gloves, blankets, scares, sweaters, dolls, and a variety of other high quality products.

In their native country of Peru, there are 52 natural Alpaca colors recognized. Her in The United States, we only recognize 16 of those colors.

While Alpaca’s are fairly new to The United States, they have actually been domesticated for thousands of years. The Moche, of northern Peru, have been breeding Alpaca for as far back as we can tell. Alpaca can be seen in art from all periods in which the Moche are known to exist.

Some Alpacas are friendlier than othersThere are no Alpaca known to live in the wild, strictly reserved for living on an Alpaca farm. The closest known relative of the Alpaca is the wild Vicuna. The Vicuna is also native to South America and is well known for producing soft fiber. Both Alpaca and Vicuna are members are classified as camelids, in the same ground as camels.

Alpacas are also social heard animals and cannot be expect to live alone. They are considered pray animals and they will always run from a fight if they can. If they need to defend themselves, they can kick and spit. While an Alpaca kick is not as deadly as a kick from hooves animals, because they have two soft padded toes, it will still leave a good bruise.

Breeding Your Alpaca

There is a lot to look at when you are breeding an Alpaca, but keep in mind that it is not an exact science. We have included a few considerations that you should think about

Herd Size

The Benefits Of Owning An Alpaca FarmYou don’t want to be put in a position where you have more Alpaca’s than you have room for on your Alpaca Farm. If you purchase 4 pregnant female Alpaca’s, then keep in mind that you are really purchasing 8 Alpaca’s that you will need room for. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that you only need room for 4.

Another thing to consider when looking at the herd size on your Alpaca farm is bloodlines. You can’t breed two animals from the same bloodline. This is important if you purchase a package of Alpaca from another farm to expand from. If they are all related and you breed them from three related males at another farm, you will end up with a bunch of Alpaca’s that are all distance relatives and can’t breed.

Color

Some farms look to end up with all of the same color or few designated colors. It can be difficult to keep to specific colors with breeding, but it helps to look at the family lineage. It will be near impossible to know what color you are going to get, but you may be able to narrow it down a little.

If you discover that neither the dam nor the sire have ever produced a silver baby, than you are safe to bet that the result is not going to be gray. Some Alpaca’s have also been known to produce certain colors more often than other colors depending on the sires color. We once knew of a brown dam that would produce the same silver as the sire without fail.

Characteristics

This a very friendly AlpacaThere are several desirable characteristics found in Alpaca that can be desirable. You want to keep an eye on all of them and breed with animals that have something that yours don’t. That is the way to improve the quality of the animals in your herd.

Fleece characteristics are a good example of something that you will want to pay attention to. If both parents exhibit good coverage, density, crimp, and fineness, then you are likely to have offspring that have the same. If every Alpaca on your Alpaca farm has great characteristics, then you will be able to keep the quality of your fleece very high.

Other characteristics that you can look for have to do with showing your animal. These can include size, stature, and bight. Your Alpaca can produce the best fleece on earth but it won’t matter if they are the smallest Alpaca on earth as well.